SAPonPower

An ongoing discussion about SAP infrastructure

HPE, in an act of desperation, is spreading misinformation about SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems

Misinformation is a poor characterization of HPE’s behavior.  HPE, or some of its employees, are showing customers charts with a variety of statements which are simply untrue.  In any normal definition, this is called a lie.  This is unethical and unprofessional.  I will repeat what it says in my profile, these are my opinions, not a reflection of those of IBM.

You may have seen the blog post from Vicente Moranta: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/truth-wild-lies-being-told-hanaonpower-vicente-moranta or my own post on IBM Systems Blog: https://www.ibm.com/blogs/systems/can-you-tell-hana-on-ibm-power-systems-fact-from-fiction/ . At IBM, we have this set of ethical rules called “IBM Business Conduct Guidelines” (BCG).  This 15 to 20 page document is required reading every year with a mandatory test to ensure comprehensive understanding of these rules.  I can boil down one of the most important themes into two words: DON’T LIE!

For those of you who have been reading this blog for a while, you may question whether I am too verbose and that may be fair as I thoroughly research each subject and include attribution for claims, usually including direct links to the source of those claims.  I would never think of making up “facts” and, on rare occasion when a reader has informed me of a mistake, I always correct the mistake as well as include a comment to that effect.

Some background:  A few weeks ago, a customer sent us a list of questions about SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems.  At first, the questions seemed bizarre as they included some very pointed misunderstandings about HANA and SAP in general and IBM’s role with SAP in particular.  As I read them more thoroughly, I realized that someone or some entity had coached the customer.  This was confirmed when I received a copy of a HPE presentation from a completely different source with almost identically worded statements.  By the way, back to the BCG, IBM employees are not allowed to view much less share information from a competitor marked confidential and this presentation was not marked with anything, meaning it was being shown to customers with, or without, HPE management’s official knowledge.

Some of the lies it shares:

  • HPE has 99%+ share of the HANA market. It is kind of funny to note that this claim is contradicted in the same table where it shows 80% share for Intel.  I guess they are confusing SAP and SAP HANA markets which is misleading at best.  More importantly, SAP does not release market share information and even if they did, I think the Lenovo, Cisco, Dell and Fujitsu might together claim more than 1% of the market.
  • IBM, not SAP “delivers” HANA code to customers because they have access to SAP code and have created a “special” version of SAP HANA. Wow, it is hard to figure out where to start here.  SAP owns HANA and only they distribute code.  They refused to support other operating systems than Linux, including AIX, for the very reason of wanting a common code tree for all platforms.  HPE is correct that IBM works closely with SAP to optimize HANA code, a fact which should be lauded not criticized.  Apparently, HPE must not have such a relationship and are jealous?  What HPE does not understand is that regardless of who, IBM, Intel or other, contributes code to SAP or suggests modifications to code, SAP makes all decisions regarding that code, including support, and incorporates it into the common code tree meaning all platforms can benefit if the code is not related to a specific, proprietary instruction set.  When Intel contributed code for TSX, Power HANA was not able to use this code, but with appropriate modifications, SAP was able to add the code to call IBM’s similar “Transactional Memory” calls.  Now, there is simple logic which ensures the appropriate call is made depending on the underlying processor architecture.  Likewise, when IBM saw that the huge number of threads in its architecture might push limits in HANA, it worked with SAP to improve the thread and workload dispatch mechanisms in HANA.  When Intel released their Broadwell-EX 24-core chips and SAP approved large socket counts, these systems would have hit the same threading issues, but with the new mechanisms already in place, were able to benefit from IBM & SAP’s joint effort.  Maybe HPE means that SAP has to compile the same code as used for Intel systems on the Power platform.  Well duh, it is a different chip architecture, so this is computer science 101, but hardly a different “version”.
  • Release priority – #1 Intel, #2 Power. Wrong again HPE!  HANA 2.0 released simultaneously on Intel and Power, as they did for S/4HANA 1610 on-prem edition, support for SoH with HANA 2.0, etc.  Where do you get your misinformation HPE?  This information is widely available on SAP’s Service Marketplace and the SAP PAM.
  • Sizes supported – HPE shows Power support of “only” 4.8TB for BW, 9TB for SoH vs. 24TB for Intel and No scale-out HANA on Power – I will give HPE the benefit of the doubt on the 4.8TB statement as 6TB just came out, but the “only” part is strange in that in the same table it shows “only” 4TB support on Intel. As to 9TB SoH and lack of scale-out HANA, both are wrong and have been for a while with 16TB SoH available since December 4th, 2016, see SAP Note 2188482 and scale-out HANA since November 2015. As to the 24TB claim for Intel, the largest supported HANA appliance is 20TB, so HPE, once again, seems to be making up facts.

There were other lies, but I think you get the idea.  Here are a few suggestions:

To HPE management: Shame on you for permitting such behavior or if done with your knowledge, for encouraging it.  If you have any “integrity” (pun intended), you will fire the employees and managers responsible for knowingly spreading lies and will print a retraction in appropriate press sources and on your web site.  If you don’t, then you are demonstrating, loud and clear, that your company is not to be trusted.

To HPE employees: Unless your management takes the above suggestions to heart with appropriate action to rectify this wrong, I am not sure how you can sleep well working for a company that considers truth to be something to be sacrificed at their convenience.  Hope they are truthful about your benefits.

To SAP customers: I can only speak for myself; when a restaurant, retailer or manufacturer lies to me and/or the public, I refuse to ever do business with them again.  The old saying applies, “fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.”  When you consider the minimal differences, if any, in cost of acquisition between all HANA system providers on the market, including IBM Power

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May 15, 2017 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , ,

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